Category Archives: Trades

Can Ian Kinsler Still Play Second Base?

The baseball world was rocked last night when the Detroit Tigers and Texas Rangers hooked up for an unexpected blockbuster trade. The Tigers sent first baseman Prince Fielder and $30 million to the Rangers in exchange for second baseman Ian Kinsler.

The trade could be a massive win for the Tigers, as the team clears enough salary to lockup ace Max Scherzer, while also addressing a hole at second base (due to free agent Omar Infante).

Kinsler’s offense has undoubtedly taken a hit over the years. The right-handed batter has witnessed his home run total and park-adjusted OPS+ drop 59.3 and 11.0 percent, respectively, since 2011.

Year Age HR OPS+
2011 29 32 118
2012 30 19 97
2013 31 13 105

The bigger question in Motown, however, is whether Kinsler can actually still play his longtime position. Continue reading

What Should We Expect from Mike Morse in 2013?

Mike Morse is the definition of a late-bloomer. From 2005 to 2009, the outfielder/infielder owned a respectable but light-hitting .293/.355/.409/.764 line with a 106 OPS+. By comparison, Daniel Murphy posted a similar .291/.332/.403/.735 line with a 102 OPS+ in 2012. So while Morse could handle the stick, he didn’t change games with it. That is, until 2010. Continue reading

New Boston Red Sox Closer, Joel Hanrahan, is Not a Closer

At best, Joel Hanrahan is a good reliever. He strikes out a lot of batters (career 9.9 K/9), throws hard (consistent 96 MPH fastball), and possesses a good “out” pitch (slider has been worth 30.8 RAA in career). Yet, despite owning a perfectly projectable career 3.74 ERA vs. 3.78 xFIP, the righty’s peripherally-putrid 2012 campaign casts a shadow on his recent jettison to Boston, and subsequent named-role as closer. Continue reading

There’s Still Room for the Dodgers to Improve

Apparently no one told the Los Angeles Dodgers that other teams use a standard five-man rotation. But perhaps the Dodgers just aren’t like “other teams.” Despite already sporting a rotation of Clayton Kershaw, Josh Beckett, Chad Billingsley, Chris Capuano, Aaron Harang, and Ted Lilly, the Dodgers actively pursued starting pitching this off-season to deepen their rotation depth, inking high-priced free-agents like Zack Greinke and Japanese import Hyun-Jin Ryu. Yet even with eight viable starting pitchers for just five spots, and their cast of other positional All-Stars, there’s still room for the Dodgers to improve.…read the rest of this article at Baseball News Source.